I take on the Coronavirus

The+best+way+to+take+on+COVID-19+is+to+talk+to+your+friends.+I%27ve+kept+in+contact+by+FaceTiming+August+and+others+daily.+

Alivia Berryhill

The best way to take on COVID-19 is to talk to your friends. I've kept in contact by FaceTiming August and others daily.

Alivia Berryhill, Business Editor

 I would’ve never thought I would rather be at school than taking online classes. I miss the chaos of early release days. I miss seeing people who are strangers to me and people I am not friends with. I miss seeing all the people just for the social interaction. I miss having lunch to see all of my friends and to spend time with them. I miss my classes with my favorite teachers and classmates. I miss the Student Council meetings. I miss everything about school. These experiences are daily activities I never in a 100 years would’ve thought I would long for. I can not wait for my first day back to school and to experience all the things that I’ve missed.

Coronavirus also took school away from my mom who was about to graduate nursing school in two months. This is extremely heartbreaking to her and me. It has been her dream to work in the NICU, and she is now uncertain about when she can start working. The virus is not just affecting high school seniors, but college seniors, too. I am sad for everyone, especially the LDHS seniors. 

The new “norm” includes not going to restaurants, shopping and hanging out with friends like I used to. I miss these things more than anything. I have been going crazy not having social interaction. I am an introvert who doesn’t like to socialize a lot, but I have come to realize that not socializing at all can drive someone crazy. Even though I can not go to the mall, I have been shopping online like most people right now. I have been scrolling through Shein for countless days trying to find cheap, good clothes. I wish life would go back to what it used to be, but life as we knew it is not realistic right now. 

In times like COVID-19, people have to try looking at the bright side of everything. My coronacation has allowed me to spend time with my family, play with our new dogs, work on myself and paint like everyone else on TikTok. I have been having quality time with my dad and grandma, which is something that I barely did before. Both of them are at high risk due to past health issues or age, so I am trying to make the most of whatever time I can be with them. I’ve been hunting with my dad a few times because he loves it. Me and my grandma spend time watching our favorite show, Criminal Minds. Our new puppies, Riley and Sade, are bursts of energy that keep my family and me laughing and happy. 

A bright spot that has also been disappointing is that at the very beginning of school closure, I got my restricted license, which is a huge step. I hate not being able to go to a lot of places where I should now be able to drive. I got my restricted on Wednesday, the first Wednesday that churches were closed.  I was looking forward to driving to church that night because I had finally gotten my restricted and could go to a place I love dearly. 

While I’ve been stuck at home, I’ve tried to find creative ways to stay occupied. Recently, I painted my door in cow print and butterflies. On TikTok, this is an extremely basic thing to do. I also have helped my grandma paint her barn. I put photos up around my room to give me a positive spot to reminisce on. However, it has kept me busy and helped with all the stress of COVID-19. 

Over the break, I have learned more than just what my at-home school lessons have taught me. I’ve learned that I should take part in the moments I get to spend with people at school, even if they are not my favorite moments. I know now that the things we see as regular, like school, can be taken away in an instant. Therefore, I’ve learned never to take the small things for granted. I have a new appreciation for the time I spend with my friends, for relationships with family and for leaving the house.